Master Industrial and Applied Mathematics in Afbouw

Profile

The academic Master's degree program in Industrial and Applied Mathematics (IAM) consists of three specializations, based on a common philosophy and program structure but with different mathematical contents and fields of applications. These specializations are

  • Computational Science and Engineering (CSE),
  • Discrete Mathematics and Applications (DMA),
  • Statistics, Probability and Operations Research (SPOR).

The objective of IAM

The MSc-program in Industrial and Applied Mathematics (IAM) aims to train students to become professional applied mathematicians who are able to

  • do research in a specific field of applied mathematics, depending on the specialization chosen,
  • apply and develop mathematical methods and computational skills to solve industrial and engineering problems,
  • communicate on an academic level in an industrial, social and multi-disciplinary environment.

CSE

Besides the general objective of IAM, the CSE program focuses on the development of advanced mathematical and computational skills in order to analyze and simulate complex physical and engineering processes. Specific topics in the application domain of CSE are Fluid dynamics, Laminar and Turbulent flows, Elasticity, Acoustics, Electrical circuits and Electromagnetism, (Medical) Image Analysis and Feature extraction, Multiphase flow and Multi Scale Analysis.

DMA

Besides the general objective of IAM, the DMA program focuses on the development of advanced discrete mathematical methods and models which can be used in a wide application area, especially in the field of digital communication and information. Discrete Algebra and Geometry, Coding Theory and Cryptology, and Combinatorial Optimization are the main subjects in DMA.

SPOR

Besides the general objective of IAM, the SPOR program focuses mainly on modeling, analyzing, simulating, and optimizing processes related to the manufacturing and quality control of products and the operational management of control and distribution schemes. Typical topics of the SPOR specialization are Statistics, Probability, Deterministic and Stochastic Decision Theory, and Combinatorial Optimization.

Final qualifications

As indicated by the general objective of IAM, students are trained to become professional applied mathematicians of an academic level, able to apply and develop computational methods of a mathematical nature and capable of communicating their work to groups with varying mathematical or non-mathematical background. The resulting skills of an IAM graduate, grouped into five categories, are as follows:


1. Mathematical knowledge and insight:

  • To have a broad knowledge of applied mathematics, typically with a high level of abstraction and rigor in reasoning
  • To know the mathematics that according to international standards belong to the professional knowledge of an academically educated mathematician at the level of a Master of Science in one of the specializations in Computational Science and Engineering, Discrete Mathematics and Applications, and Statistics, Probability and Operations Research

2. Mathematical operational proficiencies:

  • To be skilled in integrating, modifying and developing the constructive methods of the chosen specialization
  • To be able to adequately treat interrelated problems of reasonable size and
    mathematical complexity

3. Proficiencies in research and design:

  • To be able to perform scientific research independently and to acquire relevant research developments
  • To be able to design and implement methods and techniques in the chosen
    specialization for practical purposes in an industrial or social context

4. Academic proficiencies and attitude:

  • To have a critical and creative attitude when working on problems, and when learning or developing recent mathematical theories and methods
  • To have insight in the social responsibilities of a mathematician with respect to his/her contribution to the solution of non-mathematical problems

5. Proficiencies in communication:

  • To be able to adequately transfer mathematical results, both orally and written, in an international context
  • To be able to lucidly communicate mathematical results with colleagues and noncolleagues

The academic Master's degree program in Industrial and Applied Mathematics (IAM) consists of  three specializations, based on a common philosophy and program structure but with different mathematical contents and fields of applications. These specializations are:

Computational Science and Engineering (CSE),
Discrete Mathematics and Applications (DMA),
Statistics, Probability and Operations Research (SPOR).

The objective of IAM
The MSc-program in Industrial and Applied Mathematics (IAM) aims to train students to become professional applied mathematicians who are able to

  • Do research in a specific field of applied mathematics, depending on the specialization chosen
  • Apply and develop mathematical methods and computational skills to solve industrial and engineering problems
  • Communicate on an academic level in an industrial, social and multi-disciplinary environment

CSE
Besides the general objective of IAM, the CSE program focuses on the development of  advanced mathematical and computational skills in order to analyze and simulate complex physical and engineering processes. Specific topics in the application domain of CSE are Fluid dynamics, Laminar and Turbulent flows, Elasticity, Acoustics, Electrical circuits and Electromagnetism, (Medical) Image Analysis and Feature extraction, Multiphase flow and Multi Scale Analysis.

DMA
Besides the general objective of IAM, the DMA program focuses on the development of advanced discrete mathematical methods and models which can be used in a wide application area, especially in the field of digital communication and information. Discrete Algebra and Geometry, Coding Theory and Cryptology, and Combinatorial Optimization are the main subjects in DMA.

SPOR
Besides the general objective of IAM, the SPOR program focuses mainly on modeling, analyzing, simulating, and optimizing processes related to the manufacturing and quality control of products and the operational management of control and distribution schemes. Typical topics of the SPOR specialization are Statistics, Probability, Deterministic and Stochastic Decision Theory, and Combinatorial Optimization.

General outline of the program

IAM is a two-year Master program. Each year is divided into two semesters and accounts for a total of 60 ECTS. One ECTS corresponds to 28 hours of study time. The IAM program for each of the three specializations can be divided into three parts:The core part of each specialization consists of at least 3 courses from the IAM basic courses, a Modeling Week (3 ECTS) and some specialization specific courses.

Parts of study program

ECTS

Core Program

39

Individual Program

51

Final Project

30

During the modeling week, students work in groups on industrial problems. The event takes place during the 10th week of the first semester. The problems are presented on Monday morning, while on Friday afternoon the groups are presenting their results.

Each group consists of 4 to 5 students, part of them Bachelor graduates from Eindhoven and the others students coming from other universities and in particular form abroad. Besides broadening of competences within groups, this heterogeneous composition works efficiently for the integration of all Master students into the program, and sets the basis for a good collaboration in the future.

IAM basic courses

Code

Course

Credits

2WA08

Applied functional analysis

6

2WN10

Scientific computing

6

2WB08

Stochastic processes

6

2WC09

Coding and crypto 1

6

The contents of the IAM basic courses cover a broad spectrum of basics in Applied Mathematics. The first three courses are prepared in collaboration with the three Dutch Universities of Technology.

The Individual Program (51 credits) is divided into a Pre-Master Program (≤ 15 credits) and an Elective Program (of ≥ 36 credits). The Master program finishes with a Final Project.

The Pre-Master Program (≤ 15 credits) is intended to bring the knowledge and skills of students with different backgrounds to a comparable level, and to provide a good connection between a student's prior knowledge and the contents of the specialization program. For each student, the Admission Committee TCW will decide on the contents of the Pre-Master Program. For details, see pre-Master.

The contents of the Elective Program can be chosen by a student according to some general rules. These rules are specific to each track, as well as the rules for choosing Electives. For example, any course in a specialization can be an elective in another specialization. Furthermore, all courses from a Master's degree program of a Dutch university or a university abroad are possible electives. For all students, the contents of the Elective Program are to be approved by the Examinations Committee.

An Internship of 15 ECTS can be included in the Elective Program of each student. This Internship can be used as a start-up of the Final Project. The decision concerning the Internship should be taken in agreement with the future supervisor of the Final Project. Every course offered by the Department of Mathematics has a dedicated folder on http://education.tue.nl. It is strongly recommended that students register for the courses they are following. This website is the main communication channel for all matters related to a specific course, including the distribution of study material or last minute changes.

The Final Project takes place in industry, at the university, or in a governmental organization during the final six months (30 ECTS) of the curriculum. The work will be carried out under supervision of a chair in Mathematics of our department. An individually assigned advisor will guide the student through this elaborate research or industrial experience.

Degree Awarding

The Master's degree program Industrial and Applied Mathematics is registered in the Dutch Centraal Register Opleidingen Hoger Onderwijs (CROHO) of the Dutch Ministry of Education as # 60347. Graduates obtain the degree of Master of Science (MSc) as well as the Dutch degree of "ingenieur", abbreviated as "ir." (cf. WHW 7.20).

Admission

The general requirements for admission to the IAM program are that the student has a Bachelor's degree of an applied mathematical signature, based on a program of academic level and quality, in order to be able to complete the IAM program successfully, and that he/she has sufficient command of English.

The body in charge of admissions to the IAM program is the Admission Committee TCW (Toelatingscommissie Wiskunde).

Part of the Individual Program, the Pre-Master Program, can be used to bring the knowledge of the students coming from different studies to a comparable level, and to provide a good connection between a student's knowledge and the contents of the core program. For each student, the Admission Committee TCW will decide on the contents of the Pre-Master Program.

A detailed account of the program for each of the three specializations we will given under:

Computational Science and Engineering (CSE)

Discrete Mathematics and Applications (DMA)

Statistics, Probability and Operations Research (SPOR)